Foundations and Futures of Feminist Technosciences
Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience, 5-year anniversary

Foundations and Futures of Feminist Technosciences
Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience, 5-year anniversary

APR 22 | 3:00 PM — 6:00 PM ET

FOUNDATIONS AND FUTURES OF FEMINIST TECHNOSCIENCES REGISTRATION LINK

REMOTE ACCESS: CRIP FEMINIST DANCE PARTY! LINK

Catalyst serves as a distinctive forum for both emerging and well-established scholars to publish interdisciplinary work. Catalyst aims to publish critically engaged feminist STS scholarship that reroutes the gendered, queer, raced, colonial, militarized, and political economic beings and doings of technoscience. Catalyst was awarded the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) Infrastructure Prize in acknowledgement of “the outstanding work done by the Catalyst editorial collective in support of theoretically inventive and methodologically creative feminist scholarship that spans the social sciences, humanities, and arts,” in 2020.

CART and ASL are provided thanks to the generous support of the NYU Center for Disability Studies

Foundations of Feminist Technosciences

3:00–4:00 PM ET

What are the stories we tell about the foundations of feminist technosciences? How do we highlight the multiple and rich genealogies of the field that embodies anti-racist, decolonial, and multispecies feminist technosciences? The panel reflects on how we can sort out the frictions and generative ties of these complicated categories in the concrete, and in actual struggle, and how we can hold together simultaneously true and contradictory things. How do we try to think beyond the binary categories that often frame both the foundational categories of western science and also descriptions of the relations of western and other knowldege practices? In taking up invited questions from the audience/field, Donna and Banu will engage in a wide-ranging discussion on the foundations and journeys of feminist technosciences.

Ask Banu and Donna
In celebrating five years of Catalyst, we are using this occasion to reflect on the field of feminist technosciences, its foundations and futures. Donna and Banu welcome questions and comments for their panel. They will do their best to incorporate the questions in their discussion.
Please send your questions to banu [at] wost.umass.edu.

Futures of Feminist Technosciences

4:00–5:00 PM ET

Drawing from the foundations of feminist technosciences, what does the field of feminist STS want to do going forward? What kind of futures can we—as an intellectual and transnational collective—anticipate and imagine? How can feminist technoscience help us to better navigate contemporary planetary events and technological developments that have, disproportionately, affected human and non-human life? Which possible new metaphors, concepts, frameworks, tools, analytics, manuals, guidelines will facilitate the field and its thinkers? Four scholars, who have made important interventions (among others through their Catalyst contributions) will present their provocations and reflect on some of these pertinent questions or assist us in asking better ones.
Moderated by Dr. Nassim Parvin and Dr. Sonja van Wichelen.

Remote Access: Crip Feminist Dance Party!

5:00–6:00 PM ET

Remote Access is a crip nightlife event curated and designed by the Critical Design Lab. This project considers parties and crip nightlife events as designed spaces, with opportunities for playful and participatory ways of producing access as a collective cultural practice. Disabled people have long used remote access as a method for organizing pleasure and kinship. DJ Who Girl (Kevin Gotkin) will provide the tunes, our team (and you) will all create access to the experience together.
The Remote Access party participation guide is available at this link.





Speakers








Donna Haraway

Distinguished Professor Emerita, University of California, Santa Cruz

ABOUT THE SPEAKER



Donna Haraway is Distinguished Professor Emerita in the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California Santa Cruz. She earned her PhD in Biology at Yale in 1972 and writes and teaches in science and technology studies, feminist theory, and multispecies studies. She has served as thesis adviser for over 60 doctoral students in several disciplinary and interdisciplinary areas. At UCSC, she is an active participant in the Science and Justice Research Center and Center for Creative Ecologies.

Attending to the intersection of biology with culture and politics, Haraway’s work explores the string figures composed by science fact, science fiction, speculative feminism, speculative fabulation, science and technology studies, and multispecies worlding. Her books include Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene; Manifestly Haraway (2016); When Species Meet (2008); The Companion Species Manifesto (2003); The Haraway Reader (2004); Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium (1997, 2nd ed 2018); Simians, Cyborgs, and Women (1991); Primate Visions (1989); and Crystals, Fabrics, and Fields (1976, 2004). A feature-length film made by Fabrizio Terravova, titled Donna Haraway: Story Telling for Earthly Survival, ( 2016, available as a DVD). With Adele Clarke she co-edited Making Kin Not Population (Prickly Paradigm Press, 2018), which addresses questions of human numbers, feminist anti-racist reproductive and environmental justice, and multispecies flourishing.








Donna Haraway is Distinguished Professor Emerita in the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California Santa Cruz. She earned her PhD in Biology at Yale in 1972 and writes and teaches in science and technology studies, feminist theory, and multispecies studies. She has served as thesis adviser for over 60 doctoral students in several disciplinary and interdisciplinary areas. At UCSC, she is an active participant in the Science and Justice Research Center and Center for Creative Ecologies.

Attending to the intersection of biology with culture and politics, Haraway’s work explores the string figures composed by science fact, science fiction, speculative feminism, speculative fabulation, science and technology studies, and multispecies worlding. Her books include Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene; Manifestly Haraway (2016); When Species Meet (2008); The Companion Species Manifesto (2003); The Haraway Reader (2004); Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium (1997, 2nd ed 2018); Simians, Cyborgs, and Women (1991); Primate Visions (1989); and Crystals, Fabrics, and Fields (1976, 2004). A feature-length film made by Fabrizio Terravova, titled Donna Haraway: Story Telling for Earthly Survival, ( 2016, available as a DVD). With Adele Clarke she co-edited Making Kin Not Population (Prickly Paradigm Press, 2018), which addresses questions of human numbers, feminist anti-racist reproductive and environmental justice, and multispecies flourishing.




Banu Subramaniam

Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

ABOUT THE SPEAKER



Banu Subramaniam is Professor of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Trained as a plant evolutionary biologist, Banu’s work engages the feminist studies of science in the practices of experimental biology. Author of Holy Science: The Biopolitics of Hindu Nationalism (University of Washington Press, 2019), Ghost Stories for Darwin: The Science of Variation and the Politics of Diversity (University of Illinois Press, 2014), and coeditor of MEAT! A Transnational Analysis (Duke University Press 2021), Making Threats: Biofears and Environmental Anxieties (Rowman & Littlefield, 2005), and Feminist Science Studies: A New Generation (Routledge, 2001). Banu’s current work focuses on decolonizing botany and the relationship of science and religious nationalism in India.








Banu Subramaniam is Professor of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Trained as a plant evolutionary biologist, Banu’s work engages the feminist studies of science in the practices of experimental biology. Author of Holy Science: The Biopolitics of Hindu Nationalism (University of Washington Press, 2019), Ghost Stories for Darwin: The Science of Variation and the Politics of Diversity (University of Illinois Press, 2014), and coeditor of MEAT! A Transnational Analysis (Duke University Press 2021), Making Threats: Biofears and Environmental Anxieties (Rowman & Littlefield, 2005), and Feminist Science Studies: A New Generation (Routledge, 2001). Banu’s current work focuses on decolonizing botany and the relationship of science and religious nationalism in India.




Moya Bailey

Assistant Professor, Northeastern University

ABOUT THE SPEAKER



Moya Bailey is Assistant Professor of Africana Studies and the program in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Northeastern University. Her work focuses on marginalized groups’ use of digital media to promote social justice as acts of self-affirmation and health promotion, and she is interested in how race, gender, and sexuality are represented in media and medicine. Bailey currently curates the #transformDH Tumblr initiative in Digital Humanities. She is also the digital alchemist for the Octavia E. Butler Legacy Network. She is an MLK Visiting Scholar at MIT for the 2020–2021 academic year.








Moya Bailey is Assistant Professor of Africana Studies and the program in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Northeastern University. Her work focuses on marginalized groups’ use of digital media to promote social justice as acts of self-affirmation and health promotion, and she is interested in how race, gender, and sexuality are represented in media and medicine. Bailey currently curates the #transformDH Tumblr initiative in Digital Humanities. She is also the digital alchemist for the Octavia E. Butler Legacy Network. She is an MLK Visiting Scholar at MIT for the 2020–2021 academic year.




Max Liboiron

Associate Professor, Memorial University

ABOUT THE SPEAKER



Dr. Max Liboiron (they/she) develops and promotes anticolonial research methods into a wide array of disciplines and spaces. As founder of CLEAR, an interdisciplinary plastic pollution laboratory whose methods foreground humility and good land relations, Liboiron has influenced national policy on both plastics and Indigenous research, invented technologies and protocols for community monitoring of plastics, and led the development of the interdisciplinary field of discard studies. Liboiron’s book, Pollution is Colonialism, will be released by Duke University Press in April 2021. Dr. Liboiron is an Associate Professor in Geography and is formerly the Associate Vice-President (Indigenous Research) at Memorial University.








Dr. Max Liboiron (they/she) develops and promotes anticolonial research methods into a wide array of disciplines and spaces. As founder of CLEAR, an interdisciplinary plastic pollution laboratory whose methods foreground humility and good land relations, Liboiron has influenced national policy on both plastics and Indigenous research, invented technologies and protocols for community monitoring of plastics, and led the development of the interdisciplinary field of discard studies. Liboiron’s book, Pollution is Colonialism, will be released by Duke University Press in April 2021. Dr. Liboiron is an Associate Professor in Geography and is formerly the Associate Vice-President (Indigenous Research) at Memorial University.




Tania Pérez-Bustos

Facultad de Ciencias Humanas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia

ABOUT THE SPEAKER



I am a feminist scholar working on technologies and knowledge dialogues. I currently focus my research interests on handmade textiles as technologies of knowledge and care. I am the founder of Artesanal Tecnológica and work at the School of Gender Studies at the National University of Colombia. I am interested in transdisciplinary work from which to explore methodologies that enable transformative research and pedagogies.








I am a feminist scholar working on technologies and knowledge dialogues. I currently focus my research interests on handmade textiles as technologies of knowledge and care. I am the founder of Artesanal Tecnológica and work at the School of Gender Studies at the National University of Colombia. I am interested in transdisciplinary work from which to explore methodologies that enable transformative research and pedagogies.




Thao Phan

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation

ABOUT THE SPEAKER



Thao Phan is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation. She is a feminist STS scholar who analyses the technologization of gender and race in algorithmic culture. Her article ‘Amazon Echo and the Aesthetics of Whiteness’ was awarded the 2019 Nicholas C. Mullins Prize by the Society for the Social Studies of Science (4S). She is also the co-founder and convenor of AusSTS—a network that brings together STS researchers across the Australasian region.








Thao Phan is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation. She is a feminist STS scholar who analyses the technologization of gender and race in algorithmic culture. Her article ‘Amazon Echo and the Aesthetics of Whiteness’ was awarded the 2019 Nicholas C. Mullins Prize by the Society for the Social Studies of Science (4S). She is also the co-founder and convenor of AusSTS—a network that brings together STS researchers across the Australasian region.




Aimi Hamraie

Associate Professor, Vanderbilt University

ABOUT THE SPEAKER



Aimi Hamraie is Associate Professor of Medicine, Health, & Society and American Studies at Vanderbilt University, where they direct the Critical Design Lab. Hamraie is author of Building Access: Universal Design and the Politics of Disability (University of Minnesota Press, 2017) and host of the Contra* podcast on disability, design justice, and the lifeworld. Their interdisciplinary research spans critical disability studies, science and technology studies, critical design and urbanism, critical race theory, and the environmental humanities. Hamraie is also a certified permaculture designer, a co-founder of the Nashville Disability Justice Collective, and an organizer for the Nashville Mutual Aid Collective.
Hamraie lives and works in the original homelands of the Cherokee East, Chickasaw, and Shawnee people.








Aimi Hamraie is Associate Professor of Medicine, Health, & Society and American Studies at Vanderbilt University, where they direct the Critical Design Lab. Hamraie is author of Building Access: Universal Design and the Politics of Disability (University of Minnesota Press, 2017) and host of the Contra* podcast on disability, design justice, and the lifeworld. Their interdisciplinary research spans critical disability studies, science and technology studies, critical design and urbanism, critical race theory, and the environmental humanities. Hamraie is also a certified permaculture designer, a co-founder of the Nashville Disability Justice Collective, and an organizer for the Nashville Mutual Aid Collective.
Hamraie lives and works in the original homelands of the Cherokee East, Chickasaw, and Shawnee people.




Kevin Gotkin

Visiting Assistant Professor, New York University

ABOUT THE SPEAKER



Kevin Gotkin is an artist, academic and activist. He is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Media, Culture & Communication at New York University and Co-Director, with Simi Linton, of Disability/Arts/NYC from 2016 - 2019. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 2018. His writing has been published in Disability Studies Quarterly, Dance Magazine, The Avery Review and more. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence in the Critical Design Lab. His creative work includes a disability-centered DJ practice, audio production and video works.








Kevin Gotkin is an artist, academic and activist. He is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Media, Culture & Communication at New York University and Co-Director, with Simi Linton, of Disability/Arts/NYC from 2016 - 2019. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 2018. His writing has been published in Disability Studies Quarterly, Dance Magazine, The Avery Review and more. He is currently the Artist-in-Residence in the Critical Design Lab. His creative work includes a disability-centered DJ practice, audio production and video works.